Thursday, October 15, 2015

Good Fences #82

You don't see too many split-rail fences in this part of Texas...
 because our clay-based soils move around too much and sooner than later, they all end up like this...
Here's the link-up!
 
1. Link in a post featuring a photo or photos of fences or gates.
2. Link back to Run*A*Round Ranch Report in your post or use the badge code to display the Good Fences button in your post that automatically links back here.
3. If time allows, please visit some of the other participants and comment on their shared posts.

Thank you!

123 comments:

HOOTIN ANNI said...

Split rail, I think, is one of the most attractive fences. Especially out in the open country.

Christine said...

As they are practically nonexistent in N. Ireland, I really like seeing split rail fencing. Its quite the woodworking art!
Thanks again for hosting! Have a great day!

DeniseinVA said...

There are so many different styles of split fencing and I seem to like all of them, these included. Fallen but still noteworthy :) Thanks for hosting Theresa.

Jacquelineand.... said...

Works about the same around here; lots of clay in our soil too. A pity, because I love a split-rail fence.

Buttons Thoughts said...

Morning Tex that looks like work to me. We do have almost all split rail fences here on the farm. Hug B

EG CameraGirl said...

That's interesting about clay-based soil - I would have thought clay being heavy it would be more solid than other soils. I just learned something new!

Cath said...

I just love those split rail fences...it's condition just adds to its charm!

Breathtaking said...

I like all wooden fences, and this one is very attractive. Shame about the subsidence due to the clay soil.

Rose said...

You know, I had not noticed that you seldom show fences like this...in fact I can't remember if you ever have. But then my rememberer is not the greatest. It would not keep anything inside, would it?

eileeninmd said...

Good morning, Tex! I like the split rail fences. We see a lot of them around here and we do have the clay soil. Great fence shots, thanks for hosting. Have a happy day and week ahead!

Lynn said...

Looks like someone has a little work to do:@)

Francisco Manuel Carrajola Oliveira said...

Fotografias magnificas.
Um abraço e continuação de uma boa semana.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Theresa - are they meant to be like that? Or are the jumping poles? THey are different to normal .. cheers Hilary

Mersad said...

Lovely fence shots. I like the rugged and worn look to these here.

Mersad
Mersad Donko Photography

Liz Needle said...

Love them. We used to see old ones around but most have fallen down now and replaced with concrete strainers and barbed wire. Ugh!!

Karen S. said...

I have the same problem in a couple of places even in our rich dirt. Thanks to the widening of our street we had to remove ours from the beginning of the driveway, but we still have the one around are patio!

Cranberry Morning said...

Interesting! And I'd never heard of anyone watering the foundation of their house until out daughter and SIL moved to your neck of the woods! :-)

Julia said...

We have lots of clay here too so all our fences are cedar post with wires and electric fences.
Great shots Theresa.
Hugs,
JB

Gayle said...

Interesting about the soil. AtMuldoon is pure sandstone. The neighbors; clay. Others are a mix. That's what happens living on the moraine left from the ice age.

Cranberry Morning said...

Interesting! And I'd never heard of anyone watering the foundation of their house until out daughter and SIL moved to your neck of the woods! :-)

CelestinaMarie@SouthernDayDreams said...

Hi Tex, I love a split rail but they do fall apart here in Texas because of the clay soil. Great shots! Have a nice day and thanks for hosting.
Hugs, cm

LV said...

In Texas you might see most any kind of fence. Sometimes you just have to make do with you have. No matter, your photos makes any fence look good. Hope all is okay with you.

DJan said...

I didn't know that about clay and fencing. I saw a purple picket fence yesterday and would have taken a picture if I hadn't been in a moving car. :-)

Dicky Bird said...

split rail is one of my favorite fence styles. We have clay soil here in Ringle too - so our fences end up looking like this too.

Tanya Breese said...

i love split rail but interesting fact about tx not having much of it!

Phil Slade said...

Yes, that's interesting about clay soils. I would have expected them to better for fencing.

Sally said...

We see quite a lot of those fences around here. :)

xoxo

Lynne said...

Split rail fences used to be "the thing" here in Michigan.
I would see them often . . .
Not much anymore . . .
Just had a thought for a fence post though . . .
A few roads from me there is a "mighty fine" split rail fence around a corner property . . .
CLICK!

Sandra said...

even falling down they are still pretty to me. i remember the clay, we had red clay in KY and in the wet months our shoes were caked with it.

~Lavender Dreamer~ said...

I like these fences too! And I love those roadrunner pics! WOW! I haven't seen one of those in years. Hugs!

Debbie said...

awwwww, someone should have told them, i'll bet they did not know!! i like this type of fence, i hope it was decorative and not intended to hold back bulls ;)

b.."E"..th said...

i guess that makes sense. i never would have thought about it, until you mentioned it. we see a few like this in VA. i guess they are more worried about their creatures getting out so they are usually always perfect. usually?! ( :

ladyfi said...

Poor fences - but they do create a nice pattern even when broken...

orchid Miyako said...

Dearest Theresa; Oh, it is sad to see or knew these split-rail fences; which means not working well as fences, I never knew about 'clay-based soils move around too much', even thought opposite :-)

Sending Lots of Love and Hugs from Japan to my Dear friend in America, xoxo Miyako*

Birdman said...

With this 'hangin' rail, it might be awhile before the 'cows come home' tonight. haha

joeh said...

I did not know that.

Gail said...

Still a pretty fence.

Lois Evensen said...

Nice. :) Although it won't "fence much in" it is a lovely image.

Primitive Stars said...

Morning, I do love a split rail fence though.Blessings Francine.

Pom Pom said...

There are so many split rail fences in Colorado and our soil is clay, too. I'm glad ours haven't drooped.
I hope you are doing well, good TexWis.

S. J. Qualls said...

They are more attractive to start with though.

Melissa said...

It's still a pretty fence, but now that you mention it, I agree, you often see it drooping like that.

Terri @ Coloring Outside the Lines said...

Boy, that's the truth. Even our t-posts are sinking and shifting in this dry clay. Have a great day, Theresa!

Miss Val's Creations said...

That stinks! Now all sorts of animals can cross the fence.

Andrea Priebe said...

Really, I would have though clay would make a good sticky base ... it moves around? What causes it to move? I was a nice fence ... too bad.
But it still makes a good picture :)

Andrea @ From The Sol

The Queen Jester said...

We had heavy clay soil in our yard in Wisconsin as well, so I understand completely. They are nice fences though...always fun to see one.

happywonderer.com said...

Well, that's something I didn't know about the soil. I enjoy split rail fences...

ellen abbott said...

hey Tex, did any of those rain tree seed I sent ever sprout?

Kate said...

I'd better get busy and find some fences to photograph so I can get back here! Didn't know that about split rail fences, but what do I know ?!

Bob Bushell said...

Well, a broken fence. A clay soil is to blame, poor fence.

Debby Ray said...

I love a split rail fence but never knew that clay in the ground is what pulled them apart....interesting!

Robert Bennett said...

Looks a bit like my parents place out in Montana.

Paula said...

Whoops more work to do now. Interesting info.

magnoliasntea said...

We have the same problem with clay soil here in E. Tenn.
Love split rail fences though.

Sylvia K said...

Love the split rail fence, too. Don't see many here in the northwest though. Hope you have a great weekend!! Enjoy!

Penelope Postcards said...

Interesting about the soil … the fence looks a little deflated but would be fun to step over. :)

Jan said...

I think it's worth a little maintenance to have split rail fences around the ranch.

Laura. M said...

Good photos, Teresa ;)

Karen said...

We have clay here as well, our backyard fences are leaning!

Tamago said...

Split, but still, they look beautiful :-)

John @ Sinbad and I on the Loose said...

A fine example of Texas on the move.

Bas said...

maar men zou het ook regelmatig kunnen onderhouden.

Liz said...

That does explain a lot! I never considered the lack of split rail fences to be linked to the soil. We do have a lot of fences like that in Australia!

A Quiet Corner said...

I never realized that there is such a shift in the soil down there because split rail fences are a long time favorite of mine...:)JP

Ida said...

So it's true....What goes up must come down! - You wouldn't think that the soil could make such a difference but apparently it does.

Lynn said...

interesting, these were all I saw as a kid (mid BC Canada)...

Gosia k said...

interesting fence we don't have those type in Poland

Mama Zen said...

Same here. They sure are pretty, though.

jeannettestgermain said...

You taught me something about clay I didn't know - when I grew up I lived in Holland in a heavy clay area. Happy weekend to you!

Pantherka said...

Interesting a fence ...

RedPat said...

I never knew there was that kind of problem with clay soil!

Nancy Chan said...

These split-rail fences really keep the farmers busy mending the fences! Have a beautiful day!

messymimi said...

Barbed wire, or "bobware" as i've heard some say it, is the way to go!

nookworm said...

I didn't know that! There are many in the NE but in our area the stone wall fences are abundant.

William Kendall said...

I would not have known that!

eViL pOp TaRt said...

I love split rail fences!

Stephen Hayes said...

Metal fences aren't as attractive but probably last longer.

Kovács Miklós said...

There are so many kind of fences in your region. Nice shots.
Greetings

Red said...

I never thought about soil and fences. Rail fences are usually in places where they have trees that can be easily made into rails.

Felicia said...

love to see those split rails but can see why they don't work well in your neck of the woods.

Robin Lamb said...

T, gives it some character, I guess!

Lois said...

Well it still makes for good pictures!

pattisjarrett said...

I've seen fences that resemble your example. I hadn't equated the dropped rails to shifting soil. Makes perfect sense!

Mary Kirkland said...

I've seen some like that. Great pictures.

Liz@ Infuse With Liz said...

Ah that makes sense. Funny the little things one doesn't know!

Jerry E Beuterbaugh said...

Hey, it happens.

ifthethunderdontgetya™³²®© said...

Good information, TWG. They're nice to look at, in any case.
~

~Kim at Golden Pines~ said...

I had no idea they could do that! --Only in Texas! ;-)!!!

Stephanie said...

Split Rail fencing is one of my favorites. Great captures!

Paul said...

"Who let the cows out"!
Oh, guess it was the clay based Texas soil...

Sure is a nice looking style of fence though. I've seen a number of these fences over here on the West Coast of Canada. Guess it's because Red Cedar is so plentiful and easy to split long and work with.

Alica said...

Split rail fences are some of my favorite! But yes, so hard to take care of.

Indrani said...

Good captures!
Thank you for hosting.

Linda said...

We've had that happen too.

Rita said...

I did not know that. Maybe whoever built the fence didn't know that, either. LOL! ;)

Marit Sønstebø said...

Nice split fence! We have also a lot of clay here.

Revrunner said...

Interesting. Hadn't thought about soil composition.

Anvilcloud said...

Well, that was somewhat educational.

Janey and Co. said...

We have several fences that end up that way in Colorado....and it really bugs me that they don't fix them.

Terry and Linda said...

Fixing fence is a forEVER job! Everywhere!

Linda
http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com

Lisa @ Two Bears Farm said...

We have a lot of split rail fencing in our area but at this point it is more decorative than functional.

Lowcarb team member said...

Thanks for sharing.
So many different type fences and of course it pays to heed what type of soil you have ... but sometimes we can't do too much about it!

All the best Jan

Debby@Just Breathe said...

That's too bad after the hard work of putting up the fence.
Have a nice weekend.....

Uppal said...

Still eye catching in times of designer fences!

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

Huh, who knew? I learned something new here! As I guess so did the people who put up that fence. (At least I didn't have to work as hard learning about your soil! )

Maggid said...

I learn so many things from you . . and - this is one of them. (who knew??? well, YOU did, of course . . . )

♥ Łucja-Maria ♥ said...

Hello
Your photos are wonderful, as usual.
Fence very interesting.
Happy weekend.

Meggie said...

Yep...I've had one of those fences. I was always pushing it back together...thank goodness it was a short area down the driveway. Thanks again for hosting Good Fences

NatureFootstep said...

for some reason I wanted to get on a horse and jump it :)

Our photos said...

Still nice !

Black Jack's Carol said...

Dear TexWis.. Bill says he agrees with all the above 109 comments. :) Seriously, a little duct tape could make that fence go another ten years. :) We both say "HI" and hope all is fine in your world!

wildlifewatcher said...

Hi Tex, Oh yes, I do remember that high water table with the subterranean Crayfish. Yes, that soil does move. That is why many old old homes have hardwood Bois de Arc tree stumps as their foundation. Have a great weekend!

Cheri Savory Spoon said...

Hi Tex, you should be writing for the welcome to Texas community, all of your photos animal and gates over the past few years makes me want to visit there. Beautiful country.

Linda at To Behold The Beauty said...

I like the look of split rail fences, but apparently they're not very practical in your part of the country.

Mariette VandenMunckhof-Vedder said...

Dearest Theresa,
One cannot even mend them when dealing with such problems. Sad, because it is a lot of work for putting them up!
Happy weekend and hugs,
Mariette

Kenneth Cole Schneider said...

I don't think y0u have any tall straight trees left! Sorry I was late and could not place a link but thanks for hosting!

rainfield61 said...

A broken fence, a broken art piece.

Sharon Wagner said...

That fence isn't keeping too many critters out.

Magia da Inês said...

-`❀´-
Gosto da paisagem tranquila.
Bonitas fotos.

Ótimo fim de semana cheiinho de alegrias!
Beijinhos.
❀❀ه° ·.

John's Island said...

Hi Tex, Congrats on Good Fences #82. Wow, I sure didn't know that about the soils moving around. Interesting! Have a fine weekend!

Helma said...

Too bad there are not so many fences seen in that part of Texas, but you know, do not always find something beautiful :-)

Brian King said...

Nice! That's the kind of fence you'd see around here.

Pix Under the Oaks said...

I love a split rail-rail fence! I DO love your fencing though. If we weren't bouncing around with the idea of selling the Tiny Ten every second, I would love to put up some fence like you have!

Annesphamily said...

My life feels like that broken fence right now. Beautiful capture. Take care.

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